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Pro-Pacific's Abbreviated Guide to Water Usage in Foodservice

By Pro-Pacific / Jul 31, 2018

Pro-Pacific's Abbreviated Guide to Water Usage in Foodservice

We all know that water is critical to life, but it's also critical to the life of a foodservice operation. Whether you're a school nutrition program in Seattle or opening a new restaurant in Portland, how you save, purify, and use water will certainly have a great impact on not just your operational processes, but also your overhead.

This is something we've always believed here at Pro-Pacific, and that's why we've selected a range of manufacturers that can help our clients achieve their water objectives. So let's take an abbreviated look at our guide to water usage in foodservice as we analyze two important areas of consideration.

USING & SAVING WATER IN FOODSERVICE

Like other utilities and even the cost of food, water bills can be a big variable in foodservice expenditures across the Pacific Northwest. When you consider the volume, foodservice represents one of the highest water-using sectors outside of residential. 

According to the Alliance for Water Efficiency, escalating energy and utility costs directly relate to the current trend in foodservice operators looking for innovative ways to reduce costs, and as such, foodservice equipment manufacturers have responded with research, development, and production of water-saving solutions.

FIXTURES AND PARTS

Water usage starts at the faucet, and small parts can have a big impact. When you select the right fixture and parts, you have an opportunity to drive down water and energy costs with ever installation. Don't forget. Like air, water is heated as well, so when you use an excessive amount of hot water, that is a waste of energy as well as water.

Spray valves, aerators, and cartridges can all impact savings. It's also important to keep a close eye on wearable parts over time, checking these areas can be a great way to save.

ts brass

[See large savings from a relatively small investment with T&S]

DIPPER WELLS

Dipper wells have always been critical to customer safety and to meeting health code regulations. And there are two basic choices when selecting a dipper well, plus the addition of a newer technology.

In the past, foodservice operations would have the choice of a continuous flow dipper well, which are marginally effective and extremely wasteful, as water is constantly running. The other option was a thermal system that tends to splash and burn employees while overheating utensils, which can cause its own set of problems.

A new solution from Nemco called RinseWell uses an innovative sanitizing technique with advanced optics to eliminate all the problems caused by traditional methods. Check out the details in this short video: 

WAREWASHING

Though they can vary in shape, size, and style, the biggest consumer of water in any foodservice operation is likely the warewasher. There are some tips, though, for making commercial dishwashing more efficient. Consider these from the Fisher Nickel Food Service Technology Center:

  • * Only run full racks, and you can save hundreds of dollars annually.
  • * Turn of dishwashing machines at night, as well as booster heaters.
  • * Make sure the water pressure isn't too high. Most machines require 20 psi.
  • * Follow guidelines for tank and rinse water temperatures
  • * Provide needed maintenance.

The right commercial dishwasher can help your operations save on thousands of dollars each year, but it's often difficult to know just how much you can save by switching brands or by choosing one unit over another in the first place.

Power Soak

[Use the ROI Calculator from Power Soak]

championindustries

[Use the ROI Calculator from Champion]

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[Get a free assessment from Pro-Pacific]

PURIFYING WATER IN FOODSERVICE

Bad water impacts every aspect of foodservice operations. From ice to drinking water, things like chlorine, sediment, and hardness minerals can cause unpleasant aromas and flavors.

Beyond consumption, bad water can have a huge impact on foodservice equipment, as well. In fact, when you consider ice machines, 70 percent of all ice machine service calls are due to water-related issues, as these sediments can also build up in ice machines. Chlorine? Though it helps us from contracting water-borne illnesses, it can cause severe corrosion in units like combi ovens and steamers. Compounds that cause hard scale in water are also damaging to equipment.

Whether it's an avid coffee drinker in Seattle or an ice machine supplying a salmon display at the Pike Place Fish Market in Seattle, there are different types of water filtration systems available from OptiPure that can help.

Check out the OptiPure eBook Library, or schedule a free water consultation with Pro-Pacific to learn more about using, saving, and purifying water in your foodservice operation.

Pro-Pacific Equipment Consultation

Topics: optipure, T&S Brass, NEMCO, RinseWell, Champion Dishwashing, Power Soak, Unified Brands, water purification, Dipper-Wells

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